Methadone, Suboxone and Ibogaine

For many addicts, opiate agonist drugs like Methadone and Suboxone are life saving options that allow them to transition out of addiction.

Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) is an effective treatment for addiction to drugs such as heroin, oxycodone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), fentanyl and Percocet. However,  Methadone and Suboxone create a chemical dependency; essentially swapping one addiction for another. Many patients remain on these drugs for months, years, or even for life, subject to an array of side effects.

In the case of methadone, there’s a high risk of abuse with serious side effects that range from drowsiness and gastrointestinal upset to irregular heartbeat, depressed respiratory function and seizures.

Many patients that have relied on Methadone or Suboxone eventually reach a point where they want to be free of the medication, but are daunted by the withdrawal process.

Enter: Ibogaine, a naturally occurring psychoactive substance found in the Tabernanthe iboga plant. Traditionally used for spiritual and ritual purposes in West Africa, Ibogaine has shown to be effective in treating addiction to opiates by easing withdrawal symptoms and cravings. But how does it compare to Methadone or Suboxone?

To answer this question, it’s important to understand the differences between the three substances and how they affect brain receptors. 

Methadone.

Methadone is a full opioid agonist.  This means that the drug binds to opioid receptors in the brain and activates them. As a result, users don’t feel cravings for other opioids, like heroin or prescription painkillers and uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms like nausea and vomiting are kept at bay. However, by occupying brain receptors, Methadone creates a chemical reaction that leaves an individual vulnerable to dependence.

Suboxone.

Suboxone is a synthetic opioid that was developed with the intention to help treat opioid addiction. Suboxone is  made with 80 percent buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, and 20 percent naloxone, a medication used to block the effects of opioids.

When Suboxone is consumed, buprenorphine binds to receptors in the brain and activates them in a way that provides relief from withdrawal symptoms, while  the naloxone blocks the opioid’s effect, preventing the body from experiencing any kind of high.

Ibogaine.

Like Methadone and Suboxone, Ibogaine binds to opioid receptors helping eliminate withdrawal symptoms and cravings. However, that’s where the similarities end.

Unlike Methadone and Suboxone, Ibogaine is not a synthetic opioid. It’s a naturally occurring psychoactive substance. When Ibogaine is administered, it metabolizes in the body as Noribogaine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that binds to opioid receptors. In lieu of acting like a stand-in for other opioids, Noribogaine resets the brain back to its pre-addictive state. Essentially, it turns off the withdrawal process and the neurological receptors that crave more drugs or alcohol.

How Ibogaine is administered is also very different. Methadone and Suboxone are taken on an ongoing, regular basis in order to treat opioid addiction. On the other hand, Ibogaine is typically administered only once during the detox process.

Ibogaine elicits a psychedelic state which can last from 8 to 12 hours. During this process, past traumas rise to the surface allowing addicts to gain insight into their addictions and confront old demons head-on. This added psychological benefit simply doesn’t exist with more traditional treatments like opioid agonist therapy.

In addition, the impact Ibogaine has on cravings and withdrawal symptoms is notable.

According to observational studies, a single dose of Ibogaine can decrease signs of opioid withdrawal and achieve either cessation or reduced use of opioids for up to 12 months following treatment.

Detoxing from Methadone with Ibogaine

Whether a patient is detoxing from Methadone, Suboxone or another opioid, Ibogaine offers a potential solution for addicts who want to break the chain of addiction and dependence. With that being said, Ibogaine treatment for methadone requires careful planning with an experienced medical professional.

Since methadone is a long acting opiate, a patient can’t immediately begin Ibogaine treatment after taking their last dose of methadone. Instead, a doctor will switch the patient to short acting opiates (such as morphine sulphate) prior to ibogaine treatment.

Detoxing from Suboxone with Ibogaine

Specific considerations also need to be given to patients who are detoxing from Suboxone.

As mentioned above, Ibogaine metabolizes in the body as Noribogaine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that binds to opioid receptors and helps restore them to their pre-addicted form. However, Suboxone contains the opioid blocker, naloxone, which makes it impossible for Ibogaine to do its job.

If a patient takes Ibogaine while they still have Suboxone in their system, they may still enter into a psychedelic state and experience a reduction in withdrawal symptoms. However, because brain receptors can’t be restored to a pre-addicted state, withdrawal symptoms and cravings return when the effects of Ibogaine wear off.

If a patient is using a drug like Suboxone that contains opiate blockers, it’s recommended that they wait at least 30-45 days after their last dose before taking Ibogaine. Waiting to take Ibogaine helps ensure the body is completely clear of opioid blockers and that the treatment works effectively.

For many addicts, Ibogaine is a viable alternative to opioid replacement therapy and can help individuals who’ve found other methods ineffective. However, Ibogaine isn’t for everyone.

If you’re considering Ibogaine, it’s important to only seek treatment in a facility with a high level of medical supervision. A thorough screening process that adheres to the guidelines set forth by The Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance will help determine whether Ibogaine is the right choice for your future.

Can Ibogaine cure opioid addiction?

Withdrawal is one of the most insidious aspects of addiction. Symptoms like nausea, sweating, vomiting and painful muscle cramping keep addicts chemically dependent and locked in a destructive cycle of addiction. Even for addicts who are ready to leave the life of addiction behind them, the prospect of undergoing withdrawal is daunting.

Enter: Ibogaine. A naturally occurring substance found in the Iboga plant, Ibogaine has traditionally been used for medicinal and ritual purposes in West Africa. However, Ibogaine has become a popular therapeutic tool to treat addiction to opiates, cocaine, methamphetamine, and alcohol by helping make the detox and withdrawal process much more bearable.

When considering how Ibogaine can help treat addiction, it’s best to think of it as an addiction “interruptor” rather than a cure. Ibogaine treatment helps greatly decrease– and often completely eliminate — painful withdrawal symptoms and cravings, so that an addict can take the next steps in the recovery process.

How Ibogaine works.

When alcohol and drugs are consumed, neurological receptors in your brain are triggered. These neuroreceptors drive addiction by telling the body that it needs opiates, alcohol, nicotine, or psychostimulants to feel back to normal. Eventually, your brain becomes dependent on these substances, so when a person tries to quit their addiction and substances are suddenly removed, a rebound effect occurs and the body enters into withdrawal. As the brain scrambles to regain a sense of balance, a series of uncomfortable symptoms occur.

Essentially, Ibogaine works by restoring brain receptors to a pre-addicted state. When Ibogaine is administered, it metabolizes in the body as Noribogaine. Noribogaine is a type of serotonin reuptake inhibitor that binds to opioid receptors. Essentially, it turns off the withdrawal process and the neurological receptors that crave more drugs or alcohol.

As a result, patients report little to no withdrawal symptoms and a reduction in cravings following Ibogaine treatment. Cravings and withdrawal symptoms can return after a few weeks or months, but at greatly reduced intensities. As a result, addicts have a better chance at getting clean and staying clean because they don’t have to undergo a painful detox process.

Success rate of Ibogaine. 

Ibogaine is still classified by the DEA as a Schedule 1 drug. In 1995 The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) pulled research funding for Ibogaine as a possible addiction treatment and there have been no systemic controlled trials in the United States or Europe since.

With that said, there are a number of case studies that show Ibogaine as an effective treatment for drug and alcohol addiction.

A 2017 study published in the Journal of Psychedelic Study  found that Ibogaine had positive long term effects for sufferers of chronic addiction. The majority of study participants (80%) reported that ibogaine either drastically reduced or totally eliminated their withdrawal symptoms, with 30% abstaining from opioid use for years following the treatment.

Two observational studies which were conducted in New Zealand and Mexico found that a single dose of Ibogaine decreased signs of opioid withdrawal and achieved either cessation from opioids or sustained, reduced use for up to 12 months following treatment.

In fact, patients who received Ibogaine reported a 20-50 percent rate of abstinence at a one-year follow-up point. This is compared to Suboxone, which shows a 8.6 percent success rate after an individual stops taking it to treat opiate addiction.

However, it’s important to note that research also shows that long-term recovery and relapse avoidance is dependent on whether an individual enters into rehabilitation immediately after receiving Ibogaine under the supervision of a doctor.

When Ibogaine is used to treat methamphetamine addiction, there’s a 70-90 percent success rate, but only if the patient is given proper aftercare. If an individual takes Ibogaine but then returns to their old environment where they abused meth, there’s a 90 percent relapse rate.

The importance of after-care.

To ensure you get the most out of Ibogaine treatment, it’s important you choose a treatment facility with a high level of medical supervision and support. The right facility should offer comprehensive pre-treatment and post-treatment counselling, alongside other kinds of aftercare and mental health support.

A robust after care program supports patients by providing them with tools to build self-esteem, confidence and form new, healthy habits. This typically includes a combination of traditional counselling and mental health support,  alongside a variety of holistic therapies such as acupuncture, breathwork, equine therapy, meditation, massage and yoga.

There’s no magic cure for addiction. Long term recovery is only possible if you show up and “do the work.” This means attending aftercare programs, getting involved with local support groups, NA, or AA meetings, and/or staying away from negative environments.

Ibogaine won’t magically eradicate your addiction or alter your personal habits, however it can help you get through the painful process of withdrawal so that you feel prepared to face those challenges on your own.

How to Choose an Ibogaine Treatment Center

If you’re reading this, it means you’ve made the decision to end the cycle of pain and suffering that is addiction. Recovering from substance abuse is never easy. While Ibogaine can’t cure addiction outright, it can provide relief. As a naturally occurring psychoactive substance, Ibogaine can help with withdrawals and cravings. It also has the added effect of restoring receptors in the brain to a pre-addicted state.

While Ibogaine has demonstrated to be effective in interrupting substance abuse, it’s still illegal in many countries including the USA, France, Denmark, Belgium, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Switzerland, Sweden and the UK. If you’re seeking Ibogaine treatment, there’s a good chance you will have to go abroad.

It’s estimated that there are currently 75-100 treatment centers worldwide; with new facilities continuing to open across Canada, Europe, and Latin America in response to the growing opiate epidemic.

With that said, not all Ibogaine treatment centers are created equal. As with any other rapidly expanding industry, varying degrees of quality and safety exist. When choosing an ibogaine treatment facility and provider, there are several important factors to keep in mind.

Direct supervision of a trained medical professional.

Ibogaine can be effective in treating addiction, but it’s not without its risks. The risks of Ibogaine treatment include bradycardia (slowing of the heart), liver problems, seizures, and lethal interactions with other substances. You should also avoid using ibogaine if you have a pre-existing heart condition as this can lead to dangerous reactions or even death.

A review of medical records from 1990 to 2008 found that 19 people died within an hour to three days after using ibogaine. However, it’s critical to point out that none of these deaths were attributed to the toxicity of Ibogaine itself, but rather pre-existing conditions and lethal drug interactions.

Careful screening is key when it comes to minimizing risks associated with ibogaine-assisted detoxification. For drug treatment, you should only take Ibogaine under the close supervision of a medical professional. When selecting a treatment provider, look for a facility that has a high degree of medical supervision and adheres to

the guidelines set forth by The Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance.

Prior to intake, a reputable facility will provide a thorough assessment of a patient’s psychological and biological risk factors to ensure they’re a good fit for Ibogaine treatment. This typically involves a comprehensive set of lab tests, including a full blood panel, liver function analysis, ECG/EKG and more. The right treatment center will have a medical doctor and nurses onsite (and not simply “on-call” at a local hospital). In addition, there should be comprehensive EKG monitoring throughout the treatment process.

Shamanic Retreats vs. Medical Ibogaine Treatment Centers

Ibogaine is primarily used as a treatment for substance abuse, however it’s also becoming increasingly popular as a tool for personal and spiritual development. While researching medical Ibogaine treatment centers to address your addiction, you’ll find many Shamanic Retreats that offer Ibogaine or Iboga (note: Iboga is different from Ibogaine. Iboga root bark is the raw plant medicine native to West Africa, and it contains a variety of alkaloids—one of which is Ibogaine). Shamanic retreats and medical Ibogaine centers are not one and the same.

While Iboga retreats can provide a fulfilling spiritual experience for non-addicts, they are not designed for people who have been using and are addicted to heavy drugs such as heroin, meth, or cocaine. If addiction treatment is your goal, a medically centered Ibogaine center is the safe and effective choice.

Access to counselling and rehabilitation services.

Ibogaine helps treat addiction, but it is not a be-all-end-all cure. If a facility insists Ibogaine will miraculously rid you of addiction, be very wary. Long-term success depends on a variety of factors including the support you receive before and after Ibogaine treatment.

When choosing a treatment center, consider what kinds of counselling and therapy are available to help you make the transition to a happy, healthy life. The right facility should offer comprehensive pre-treatment and post-treatment counselling, alongside other kinds of aftercare and mental health support.

A robust aftercare program will help you develop trust, self-love and positive thinking patterns. It will also teach you how to manage daily stresses in a way that’s healthy and positive. Along with counselling services, many Ibogaine treatment centers offer a range of holistic treatments such as yoga, equine therapy, breathwork, meditation, EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques), acupuncture, massage — all designed to help patients live their best, healthiest lives.

Keeping that in mind, everyone is unique and requires different things during treatment. If a particular ancillary treatment doesn’t sound like it will work for you, that’s okay. Choose a facility that offers the kind of support you need.

Treatment and recovery facilities.

Is the facility clean, comfortable and safe? Ibogaine is a powerful psychedelic that once administered, typically lasts for 8-12 hours. After receiving Ibogaine, patients typically spend a few days resting. The majority of your time at any clinic is spent getting through the Ibogaine detox period. You’ll want to feel relaxed and comfortable.

There are plenty of treatment centers that offer luxurious, resort-like facilities which include on-site entertainment, pools and other recreational activities. When making your decision, check to make sure the facility offers a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables and other detoxification amenities such as massage therapy, a spa, hydrotherapy or sauna, which can help the body flush out toxins.

Weigh what’s important to you. While access to a beach may be nice, it’s not necessarily essential to your recovery. Whatever you choose, just make sure that you don’t sacrifice medical safety for luxurious surroundings.

Realistic expectations.

Lastly, have realistic expectations about your treatment. Ibogaine can help free you from withdrawals and cravings, but it can’t teach you how to live your life differently. That’s why you should steer clear of any facility or practitioner that offers cures or guarantees.

Long term recovery is only possible if you show up and do the “work” by attending an aftercare, getting involved with local support groups, NA, or AA meetings, and/or staying away from negative environments. In other words, Ibogaine treatment isn’t an end point, but rather the first step towards a healthier, happier life.

Ibogaine: Risks and Rewards

Ibogaine is a naturally occurring psychoactive substance extracted from the West African Tabernanthe iboga plant, which contains a high concentration in its root bark. Traditionally used for medicinal and ritual purposes in West Africa, Ibogaine is now a popular therapeutic tool to treat addiction to opiates, as well as cocaine, amphetamine, and alcohol abuse.

Ibogaine isn’t considered a “cure” for addiction, but rather an addiction “interrupter,” because of its ability to eradicate or greatly reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms associated with detox. Among other benefits, it also has the added effect of restoring receptors in the brain to a pre-addicted state.

With that said, Ibogaine is not without its risks. In the United States, Ibogaine is still classified as a Schedule 1 drug because of its hallucinogenic effects, which give it a high potential for abuse. While anecdotal evidence suggests Ibogaine isn’t addictive, taking it can be dangerous if you have a pre-existing medical condition or take certain prescription drugs.

When deciding whether Ibogaine treatment is the right choice, it’s important to choose a reputable treatment center with a thorough intake process and a high-level of medical supervision. Together with a medical doctor, you can weigh the following risks and rewards to determine whether Ibogaine treatment is a good fit.

What are the benefits of Ibogaine?

Addiction doesn’t just impact the body, it also affects neurological receptors in the brain. Neuroreceptors drive addiction by telling the body that it needs opiates, alcohol, nicotine, or psychostimulants to feel back to normal. When a person tries to quit their addiction, withdrawal happens.

Common symptoms of alcohol and drug withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety
  • Cold sweats
  • Depression
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Fatigue
  • Hostility
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Nausea
  • Overpowering cravings for drugs or alcohol
  • Seizures
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Tremors
  • Vomiting

For people who want to end the cycle of addiction, going through withdrawal is a daunting prospect. However, many addicts have found that Ibogaine treatment can help make the detox and withdrawal process much more bearable.

Brain receptors are restored to a pre-addicted state.

When Ibogaine is administered, it metabolizes in the body as Noribogaine. Noribogaine is a type of serotonin reuptake inhibitor that binds to opioid receptors. It’s a compound that resets the brain back to its pre-addictive state and prevents overdose. Essentially, it turns off the withdrawal process and the neurological receptors that crave more drugs or alcohol.

Reduced withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

According to two observational studies conducted in New Zealand and Mexico, a single dose of Ibogaine was shown to decrease signs of opioid withdrawal and achieve either cessation from opioids or sustained, reduced use for up to 12 months following treatment.

As one study participant reported: “Iboga could give an opiate addict several months to half a year of freedom from craving, and a period of time in which to get their life together and learn to face things straightforwardly, directly and honestly. Iboga will not do the work for you.”

Increased abstinence

Another Ibogaine study published in the Journal of Psychedelic Study found that Ibogaine had positive long term effects for sufferers of chronic addiction. Of the 88 study participants, 80% reported that ibogaine either drastically reduced or totally eliminated their withdrawal symptoms, with 30% abstaining from opioid use for years following the treatment.

Other psychological benefits.

Although ibogaine’s main therapeutic role is in the treatment of addiction, the experience can be meaningful in other ways too. Ibogaine induces a psychedelic state, which can help patients gain insight into their lives, as well as their addiction. While in this state, deeply repressed pain and trauma often come to surface, allowing patients to confront their demons head-on. After gaining clarity on the cause of their addiction, many patients find it easier to make adaptive changes in their lifestyle.

With that said, Ibogaine can be an emotionally turbulent experience. In some cases, it can leave an individual confused, scared, or exhausted — especially if they weren’t prepared to face traumas associated with their addiction.

What are the risks of Ibogaine?

While it can offer positive benefits when treating addiction, using Ibogainedoes come with some risks. The risks of Ibogaine treatment include bradycardia (slowing of the heart), liver problems, seizures, and lethal interactions with other substances including a variety of antidepressants, antipsychotics, painkillers, antiarrhythmic drugs and other medications. You should also avoid using ibogaine if you have a pre-existing heart condition as this can lead to dangerous reactions or even death.

A study which reviewed medical records from 1990 to 2008 found that 19 people died within an hour to three days after using ibogaine. However, it’s critical to point out that none of these deaths were attributed to the toxicity of Ibogaine itself, but rather pre-existing conditions and lethal drug interactions.

It’s important to note that foods containing bergamottin or bergamot oil, such as grapefruit juice, as well as a variety of other over-the-counter medications such as Prilosec (Omeprazole), some gastric disorder drugs, antifungal medications, HIV treatment drugs, and some antihistamines, can all contribute to cardiac complications if they’re in the patient’s system at the time when Ibogaine is administered.

Because of these risks, it’s important that you only seek Ibogaine treatment in a medical facility with a thorough screening process that adheres to the guidelines set forth by The Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance.

Even if a patient doesn’t have a pre-existing condition or potential for a drug interaction, they can experience side effects of Ibogaine for anywhere between 4 to 12 hours after the substance is administered. These include:  

  • Anxiety
  • Difficulty with coordination
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Xerostomia (dry mouth)

While these side-effects can be unpleasant, they’re not life threatening with proper care from a medical professional.  This is the first step towards your new life. To minimize risks and maximize rewards of Ibogaine, make sure the treatment center you choose offers a high level of medical supervision and robust aftercare program.

Using Ibogaine to Treat Anxiety and Depression

Restlessness. Difficulty sleeping. Panic. Hopelessness. Anyone who’s ever suffered from anxiety or depression knows just how overwhelming these symptoms can be.

Ibogaine can help, allowing people to live healthier, happier lives. The naturally occurring psychoactive substance found in the West African Iboga plant has become a popular therapeutic tool for addiction to opiates, cocaine, methamphetamine, and alcohol. However it’s also shown to be an effective treatment for a variety of mental health issues like anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD).

A study published in the September 2000 issue of Neurobiological Mechanisms of Drugs of Abuse found that there are neurobiological similarities between depression and drug dependence — insomuch as many drug addicts self-medicate to treat co-occurring mental health issues. In the 2000 study, participants reported that a single-dose of Ibogaine not only helped reduce cravings for drugs, but also significantly improved depressive symptoms.

History.

The use of Ibogaine as a therapeutic tool is nothing new. For centuries, people in Gabon and Cameroon have used ground iboga as part of Bwiti, a set of socio-spiritual practices. During these rites of passage rituals, Iboga is used as a treatment for conditions we’d describe as mental illness, such as anxiety and depression.

Ibogaine was first introduced to the West through French and Belgian explorers who visited West Africa in the mid-19th century. By the 1930’s, Ibogaine was being sold as a stimulant in France under the brand name Lambarène, after it was shown that low doses of the substance provided an energy boost. It wasn’t until 1966 that Lambarène was declared illegal in France and removed from shelves.

In the 1950’s and 1960’s therapists began exploring the possibility of using Ibogaine as an antidepressant. Around the same time, Ibogaine’s anti-addictive effects were also discovered. By the early 1960’s scientists have since turned their research efforts towards studying Ibogaine as a potential treatment for opioid addiction.

Since the 1990’s, Ibogaine has become increasingly popular as a tool for personal and spiritual development, with shamanic retreats popping up all over the world. However, for individuals looking to treat anxiety, depression or addiction, the safest and most effective way to experience Ibogaine is through a medically supervised treatment center.

How Ibogaine works.

Similar to traditional prescriptive therapies, Ibogaine has been shown to biochemically control and restore balance to neurotransmitters. By targeting trauma and promoting healing in the brain, patients suffering from anxiety and depression have found significant relief through Ibogaine treatment.

According to doctor C.M. Anderson of Harvard Medical school, “Ibogaine works through multiple neurotransmitter systems to create… (a) state of plasticity similar to states of plasticity existing during fetal development.” Essentially, it can help treat traumatic memories, reverse abnormal brain functions and dissolve habitual motor patterns associated with addiction and other disorders.

After taking Ibogaine, the patient enters into a psychedelic state which can last from 8 to 12 hours. As author Peter Frank outlines in his book, Ibogaine Explained, psychedelics like Ibogaine have the power to temporarily shatter the ego, giving the individual an increased perspective on their problems and the world around them. While in this egoless state, past traumas rise to the surface, allowing people to gain insight and confront old demons head-on.

While the process of confronting unsettling parts of your subconscious can be a painful and emotionally turbulent one, Ibogaine helps patients reframe difficult past experiences in a more objective manner; allowing them to resolve lingering emotional conflict.   

Precautions. 

While these results are encouraging, Ibogaine treatment is not without risks. When Ibogaine is administered, it metabolizes in the body as Noribogaine, a type of serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Therefore, Ibogaine cannot be used in conjunction with traditional medications commonly prescribed for anxiety and depression like Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor-based drugs, as they can cause potentially fatal interactions. 

Included in this list are the following: 

  • Amitriptyline (Elavil)
  • Citalopram (Celexa)
  • Clomipramine
  • Desipramine
  • Duloxetine (Cymbalta, Ariclaim, Xeristar, Yentreve, Duzela, Dulane)
  • Escitalopram (Lexapro)
  • Imipramine (Tofranil)
  • Paroxetine (Paxil)
  • Venlafaxine (Effexor)

Along with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor-based drugs, Ibogaine can also have lethal interactions with other substances including a variety of antipsychotics, painkillers, antiarrhythmic drugs and other over-the-counter medications such as Prilosec (Omeprazole), some gastric disorder drugs, antifungal medications, HIV treatment drugs, and some antihistamines.

Careful screening is key when it comes to minimizing risks associated with Ibogaine, as it’s not recommended for individuals with a pre-existing heart condition. Therefore, it’s crucial that treatment only be administered by a facility that offers a high degree of medical supervision and adheres to the guidelines set forth by The Global Ibogaine Therapy Alliance. With attentive medical supervision and support, Ibogaine can provide a ray of light to individuals suffering from anxiety and depression.